“Love Your Enemies”

Have you taught your kids “The Golden Rule”?

You know, that famous one-liner that says, “Treat others the way you want to be treated.”

It’s definitely easier said than done! Most kids can quote this well-known aphorism, but most have a hard time applying it within conflict. In fact, many adults even struggle to treat others with the love Jesus calls us to, when they have been wronged themselves. We are in need of some practical advice. How can we treat others the right way?

We invite you into a deeper understanding of the words of Jesus: “Treat others the way God has treated you.” That is, let our behavior toward others be dependent on and reflective of God’s behavior toward us, which is ultimately the way we want others to treat us.

The way kids see it:

“She hit me, so I hit her back!”

“He stole my puzzle first—that’s why I took his book!”

“I’m eating her Cheerios because she always eats mine!”

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In the age of Batman and Ironman—a culture that emphasizes fairness, earning what you’re worth, and exercising a sort of vigilante vengeance—it is only natural to children that they should avenge themselves when wronged. In fact, there is a degree to which this intuitive sense of justice is healthy and necessary. Wrong-doing should be acknowledged and behaviors corrected. However, there is more to it than simply punishing the wrongdoer. We can invite kids to strive to make things good instead of simply making things even.

In Exclusion and Embrace, Miroslav Volf explains, “The trouble with revenge… is that it enslaves us.” When we treat others based on how they have treated us, we are letting them control us. This is reacting. Our actions toward them are completely controlled by their actions toward us. Volf says that we can become “shaped in the mirror image of” people who are unkind to us.

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Responding, on the other hand, is a process of taking the time to formulate a response based on information outside the other person. Knowing that God ultimately promises to remove all that has gone wrong with the world, we know there is hope for things to be made right again. Volf says that, knowing God’s promise that one day everything will be made right again, we are freed to see people the way God sees them, and treat them with the love and kindness God shows us. We can invite our kids into the same type of response—instead of choosing to react in anger, they can choose to join God’s plan to make everything in the world good again.

There is freedom in this! When we refuse to do what is expected—that is, to retaliate—we choose a different, better path. When I choose to respond lovingly to someone who has been unkind to me, I am empowered to choose God’s path—instead of following the path my offender has chosen for me.

Jesus was the best example of this; as Volf writes, “… Christ, the victim who refused to be defined by the perpetrator, forgives… the enemy.” One time, some soldiers and religious leaders approached Jesus, holding weapons. They already didn’t get along with Jesus, because he had disagreed with them in public many times (Luke 5:27-32; 6:1-11; 14:1-14; 20:1-8; 20:20-26), plus since they were carrying weapons it was clear they wanted to harm Jesus! Jesus’ friend Peter tried to protect him, cutting off someone’s ear in the crowd, but Jesus told Peter he didn’t want to fight, and healed the injured man. When Jesus was beaten and hung on a cross to die, Jesus prays for the people who hurt him. The Bible says God has a never-stopping, always and forever love for people. This is the example we are invited to follow when we make it our goal to treat others as God has treated us.

In this lies a compelling opportunity for our children: Choose God’s path instead of the wrongdoer’s path—treat others the way God has treated you! This requires that kids learn to be in charge of themselves. We do not mean that kids need to be in perfect control of their body—after all, kids are still learning fine motor skills and self-control as a normal stage in their development. Rather, we invite kids to intentionally choose how they react in different situations, knowing that God longs for the situation to be transformed into something good—for both them and the other people involved! We can help kids name the emotion they are feeling, think of a way God has been kind to them, and choose a similar response to how God has treated them.

Let’s invite kids to be agents of change, treating others the way God has treated them. Remind kids that bullies and mean girls are not in charge of them. Each person is in charge of him or herself. And as Christians, we choose to let God be in charge of us. In the Bible, the apostle Paul encourages us to let God’s love and peace control us, and to “overcome evil with good.”

Not only does this path free us from being controlled by another person, but it also breaks the cycle of sin, bringing God’s redemptive love into a situation. When a person treats me poorly, so I treat them poorly back—or if I even treat a third person poorly because the person who offended me put me in a grumpy mood—this simply spreads negativity.

We can invite kids to see everyday situations in a different way:

“She hit me, so I told her, ‘That hurts my body and I don’t like it. I don’t want you to feel hurt either. Let’s keep each other safe!’”

“He stole my puzzle—so I asked if we could share it and do teamwork together!”

“She ate my Cheerios, so I asked if she was hungry, then told her about the snacks she could have.”

Don’t give unkind people the satisfaction of reacting exactly the way they think you will—instead, be intentional about showing God’s love to them. This frees you from their control, breaks the cycle of badness, and even gives them a glimpse of the power of God’s love—which truly “covers a multitude of sins.” Good really can defeat evil—and not by punching it and throwing it in a prison cell—but by overcoming it with the greatest Love that has ever been known.

Hugging For Peace

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What is My Preschool Child Learning?

A familiar preschool song is “Jesus Loves Me.” Most of your kids have sang this song (or had it sung to them) and are pretty familiar with the notion that Jesus loves them. This month’s focus, just in time for Valentine’s day and all the focus on L-O-V-E, is that Jesus Loves Everyone.

We want our preschoolers to know that simple truth. Jesus loves them and everyone around them. We will hear stories of how Jesus loved others during His time on earth. How He loved the woman at the well and the scorned woman even though no one else did. How He loves us even when we do something wrong like He loved the Zacchaeus. Our preschoolers will also hear about how everyone needs Jesus and that we should tell others about Him. Each week’s lesson will come back to one simple truth: Jesus loves everyone.

Imagine how we would all act if we remembered that Jesus loves each and every one of us. We hope our preschoolers will walk away with that truth tucked in their heart. Each week we’ll ask the question “Who Does Jesus Love?” and look at stories, play games, and do activities that show your child that the answer is “Jesus Loves Everyone!” Our Memory Verse for February is “Love each other as I have loved you.” John 15:12, NIV

Here’s a week by week breakdown of the Bible stories we’ll be exploring:

Week 1 we’ll look at how Jesus loved the Woman at the Well even though she had done bad things in the past and didn’t have any friends! (John 4:1-26)

Week 2 we’ll learn about Zacchaeus the tax collector, who didn’t have any friends because he stole money from everyone. Jesus loved him anyway and because Jesus loved him, he decided to love others and give their money back! (Luke 19:1-8)

Week 3 we’ll hear about the time a group of angry men brought a woman who had been caught doing something bad to Jesus and wanted him to punish her, but he chose to love her anyway! (John 8:1-11)

And Week 4 we’ll see how Jesus’ disciples spread the good news that “Jesus Loves Everyone” just like we are learning in class! (Matthew 4:18-22, 28:16-20, John 1:35-45)

We are excited to share these stories with your preschoolers this month.  We will be having lots of fun as we hope to excite wonder in your children as we share these stories. Jesus loves everyone, and we are excited to help preschoolers at Antioch discover  that this month!

We are praying that your preschooler will have moments filled with wonder both at church and at home as we spend the month talking about the love of Jesus who loves them, made them, and wants to be their friend forever.

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Antioch Kids: Preschool

Are you wondering what your preschooler and toddler are learning on Sunday mornings in September? All month long, your child will be learning that “God loves me.”

Why does He love me”, they ask?

The answer is simple. “Because God made me!”

Week 1: The month began with us talking about creation. This lesson emphasized that God made each and every one of us.

Week 2: We will talk about the story of the lost sheep to show how much God loves us. He loves us so much that He will always search for us!

Week 3: Then we will talk about Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego and learn that not only does God love us, but He will help us.

Week 4: Finally, we will learn that Jesus is our good friend, as seen in the story when Jesus calms the storm.

Week 5: A fun review of all 4 stories we have learned this month!

Below, you will find a great tool which recommends using Bath Time as a teaching time, designed to help your child remember what they are learning on Sunday mornings!

We added a fun station to your preschooler’s Sunday morning experience. After story time, your preschooler is invited to a fun worship experience! We’d think this is one of the coolest things that happens on Sunday mornings. There is nothing as joyful as 40 preschoolers singing to God and telling Him how much they love Him! We’d love for you to check it out, too.

We are praying that you and your preschooler enjoy Sunday mornings! Let us know if there is anything we can do to help!

See you Sunday!

Linda Van Voorst