Our Covenant-Making God

Hello parents!

We’re excited to begin our second unit of The Gospel Project for Kids! Over the next three weeks, kids will learn that God is a covenant-making God. Below is a summary of the passages and main points for Unit 2.

Unit 2 Key Passage: “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness” (Romans 4:3).

Big Picture Question: What did God promise? God made a covenant to bless His people.

Session 1 | God’s Covenant with Abraham (Nov 6th)

Bible Passage: Genesis 12:1-3; 15:1-21; 17:1-9

Main Point: God promised to bless all the world through Abraham.

Session 2 | God Tested Abraham (Nov 13th)

Bible Passage: Genesis 22:1-19

Main Point: Abraham trusted God, even when he didn’t understand God’s plan.

Session 3 | The Promise Reaffirmed (Nov 27th)

Bible Passage: Genesis 25:19-26; 26:1-6; 28:10-22

Main Point: God reminded Abraham’s family that He always keeps His promises.

In Session 1, kids will learn how God spoke to Abram, calling him to leave behind his family and his lands to go to a place God would show him. God made a covenant with Abram, promising to bless all the world through one of his descendants (Gen 12:1-3). By faith, Abram obeyed. God was serious about the covenant; He always keeps His promises. God even changed Abram’s name to Abraham, which means “Father of a Multitude.” God promised to bless all the earth through Abraham. At just the right time, Jesus was born into Abraham’s family. (Gal. 4:4-5) Jesus fulfilled God’s promise to Abraham. (See Gal. 3:8.) Jesus came into the world to save sinners. Through Him, all the nations of the earth are blessed.

In Session 2, our journey takes us to an event that occurred after Abraham and Sarah had their son of promise, Isaac. Abraham received another message from God. It was a test, actually. God instructed Abraham to take his son Isaac, the son of promise, and sacrifice him on a mountain God would tell him about. Abraham had waited so many years for this child! But what did Abraham do? He woke up early the next morning and set out with Isaac to do what God commanded. By this point, Abraham had supreme faith that God was able to do anything. Hebrews 11:17-19 gives us a peek inside Abraham’s mind: “He considered God to be able even to raise someone from the dead.” Abraham showed both his love for God and his trust in Him by being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. God provided a ram for the burnt offering in place of Isaac, who was spared. This is how God showed His love for us: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross so that we could have eternal life through Him.

In Session 3’s Bible story, God reaffirmed the promise to Abraham’s son Isaac and to his grandson Jacob (Gen. 26:3-4; 28:13-14). When Isaac’s wife, Rebekah, became pregnant with twins, the babies struggled with each other in her womb. God explained their future. The older son (Esau) would serve the younger (Jacob). Their families would separate and become two nations, one stronger than the other. These things came true, but not in the way Isaac’s family would have expected. Jacob tricked his father and brother to steal the blessing. To escape his brother’s anger, Jacob fled to his uncle’s house. On the way, God spoke to Jacob in a dream. Jacob saw a stairway to heaven, and he saw God there. God repeated the promise to Jacob. He promised to be with Jacob. Explain to your kids that, like the stairway in Jacob’s dream, Jesus bridges the gap between heaven and earth. (See John 1:51.) Jesus came into the world to save sinners. Sin separates people from God, but when people turn from their sin and trust in Jesus, Jesus brings them into God’s family.

We can’t wait to dive into this exciting unit where we learn about the amazing God who loves us and keeps His promises! Check out the Gospel Project for Kids Family App or the Big Picture Cards for Families (click here for Preschool & Elementary cards) for ways to interact with the Bible content each week. We’ll see you soon!

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Antioch Kids: Elementary!

From the very beginning, God set up leaders on earth. We see in Genesis 1, God instructed Adam to rule over the fish in the sea, the birds in the air, and the livestock that moves on the ground. Much later in the Old Testament, God called out prophets, judges, kings, and priests to lead His people. Each of these leaders, although different in many ways, had one main thing in common. Their job was to follow God. An interesting pattern can be seen when they trusted and obeyed God—the people under their leadership prospered.

Obedience is trusting those who lead you by doing what you’re asked to do. God asks us to trust Him by giving us specific things to do to accomplish His work around us. He may even ask us to do something that seems too hard or too uncomfortable. But we can choose to trust that He’ll work out the details and take care of our needs. Then it’s easier for us to choose to obey and act on what we know, because we trust our ultimate Leader.

The monthly memory verse is: “Obey your leaders. Put yourselves under their authority.” (Hebrews 13:17, NIrV) Often, it’s hardest to obey when God asks us to trust another person that He has chosen to lead us. But, as long as their instructions line up with God’s commands, do what they ask of us.

In Week One’s Bible story, God places Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden with just one command (Genesis 1, 2, 3:1-24). When they make their own plan and disobey God, it has profound and lasting affects. Our Bottom Line is: I should trust and obey even when I think my way is better. Our leaders see the bigger picture and understand the greater consequences.

In Week Two’s Bible story, Noah had a history of trusting God, and continued to obey God to the smallest detail while building the ark (Genesis 6–8). Even when everyone else disobeyed, Noah followed God. Our Bottom Line is: I should trust and obey even when others don’t. Developing a pattern of obedience might prepare us for trusting God in a moment when the stakes are even higher.

In Week Three’s Bible story, God makes a big promise to Abraham, and then asks Abraham to move to a new place (Genesis 12:1-5; 13:2-18; 15:1-6). Abraham doesn’t know where or how God will keep His promises. But he trusts God. Our Bottom Line is: I should trust and obey even if I don’t know how it will all work out. We always know we can trust God, so we can confidently obey.

In Week Four’s Bible story, God asks Abraham to do something shocking (Genesis 15, 18, 21, 22). When Abraham is willing to obey and sacrifice what he loves, he demonstrates his unwavering trust in God to keep His promises. Our Bottom Line is: I should trust and obey even if it costs me something. We can trust that God wants what’s best for us.

We want to make it easy for you to continue teaching your kids about these things throughout the week! We provide you will resources to do just that! Simply download them by clicking the links below.

Week 1 Resource,   Week 2 Resource,   Week 3 Resource,   Week 4 Resource

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 By Jessica McKee ©2013 The reThink Group. All rights reserved. www.ThinkOrange.com *Used by permission.